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Post Info TOPIC: FORBRYDELSEN II (Spoiler alert - do not read if you haven't seen first series)


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FORBRYDELSEN II (Spoiler alert - do not read if you haven't seen first series)
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Did anyone watch the first series?

Having finally caught up with it all and seeing the warehouse employee did it, I'm glad I didn't upset our own resident Dane.  Wildo beware!

Anyway, it's all starting on BBC4 from 12th November.   Tak.



-- Edited by ArrGee on Monday 31st of October 2011 05:01:44 PM

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Someone's Looking At You

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RE: FORBRYDELSEN II
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Caught the repeat recently and it deserved all the aclaim it has recieved, it was excellent and utterly addictive, looking forward to the second series which is 10 parts this time. Watched the first half of the US version which is nowhere near as good but apparently there is a different murderer with a different motive so I'll stick with it.

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Must be a new trend, Scandinavian detective series. First there was Kenneth Branagh's Wallander set in Sweeden and now a Danish one.

I presume the subtitles give it extra gravitas. Generally the original language version is usually the better, rather than the inevitable US remake. It normally is, in the case of cinema anyhow.



-- Edited by noelindublin on Tuesday 1st of November 2011 03:04:02 PM

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noelindublin wrote:
I presume the subtitles give it extra gravitas. Generally the original language version is usually the better, rather than the inevitable US remake. It normally is, in the case of cinema anyhow.

I'm not against US remakes, in some cases they can add to the original.  Some episodes of the US Office are superior to the Gervais Office.

Personally I think that TV is starting to produce drama and thrillers that more than match film. 

The Sopranos, The Wire and Mad Men (like Forbrydelsen( would not work as films as they have too much depth and layers to explore in a couple of hours.  They all work because  there are a multitude of characters whose fates are intertwined.  Robert Altman  had a couple of films in The Player and Short Cuts with large ensembles, but they didn't work as well as the afore mentioned.

The DVD box set is a boon for those of us who have kids.  Gives us something to watch other than the news once we finally get kids to bed.



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Loudmouth

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I tend to watch more films than tv series. I agree that there are lots of series than because of their time allowance to develop character and plot and take these in so many different directions- this can leave the two hour movie well behind.

Two series I'd like to get in a box sets is Weeds and one which I cannot remember the name of, set in a psychiatric practice.

Weeds is about a clandestine network of ordinary people selling weed in suburban America, and sounds quite subversive. The dealers are all relatively normal people trying to ' help' their neighbours, and it is a good basic idea.

The series set in the psychiatric practice again appeals to me as I have always been interested in psychological issues and analysis, as a 'hobby' let me add. With plenty of time to let the characters breathe, as it were, a film could never really do this in its short running time.

I've read that a lot of actors are starting to prefer tv series for allowing more complex roles to be dealt with. Most big movies nowadays are just big set pieces with lots of explosions and special effects.



-- Edited by noelindublin on Wednesday 2nd of November 2011 03:22:44 PM

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noelindublin wrote:

I've read that a lot of actors are starting to prefer tv series for allowing more complex roles to be dealt with. Most big movies nowadays are just big set pieces with lots of explosions and special effects.


I have found it harder and harder in recent years to find films I like.  Whereas in the nineties there were geat films aplenty (GoodFellas, Shallow Grave, Reservoir Dogs, Shawshank Redemption), these days it seems to be Harry Potter and animated/special effects laden films.

Best films this century for me have been Lord of the Rings, Gladiator, There Will be Blood, No Country for Old Men, I Love You Philip Morris, The Damned United and The Departed.  None of which match up to Mad Men, The Sopranos, The Wire or Forbrydelsen.



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Loudmouth

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Just cought up with the movie Little Miss Sunshine last week and though that ranks as one of the best from the Noughties.

I see loads of films but should compile a list of the good ones as they tend to slip my mind.

Sideways, about the two guys doing a tour of the Californian vineyards before one of them gets hitched, ranks highly as well.

Shaun Of the Dead is up there too. Belgian film Ben X is another one.

Jonny Giles didn't think much of the Damned United, refusing to even go the premier. It would be interesting to see Johnny becoming a full time film critic!



-- Edited by noelindublin on Thursday 3rd of November 2011 04:18:13 PM

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noelindublin wrote:
Jonny Giles didn't think much of the Damned United, refusing to even go the premier. It would be interesting to see Johnny becoming a full time film critic!

The book was a lot better, but my wife enjoyed the film which says something as she hates anything to do with football.

It would more interesting if Dunphy did film reviews.  Must admit I miss RTÉ on Champions League midweeks.  So much better than ITV. 

Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz and Paul were good comedy films, and there a a whole host of films that I have wiled away a couple of hours watching to and from the US and Middle East, but generally I go away with a DVD box set to watch.  I'm still stuck on series 4 of The Wire since I stopped travelling so much.



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Loudmouth

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Two other good movies I forgot to mention are Pan's Labrynth and The Orphanage, both Spanish films which deserve to be seen.



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