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Post Info TOPIC: Sting Vs. Weller, only one way to decide....
Who's the best? [5 vote(s)]

Paul Weller/The Jam/Style Council
60.0%
Sting/The Police
40.0%


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Sting Vs. Weller, only one way to decide....
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fight!!!

mmm, maybe not, but interesting to see two of Geldof's peers, both doing a run of London dates this week.  Sting with 3 @ Hammersmith and Weller with 5 @ The Roundhouse.  Elvis Costello is weighing in with a couple at the Royal Albert Hall in May along with a fully reformed Buzz****s playing Brixton.  It's like the late 1970s all over again!

well that's ignoring the Happy Mondays, Inspiral Carpets and Stone Roses all playing soon which will be like the early 1990s.

My preference is for Weller these days, though Synchronicity and Ghost in the Machine are superb albums.



-- Edited by ArrGee on Saturday 17th of March 2012 02:09:57 PM

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Easy one for me, but predominantly based on Jam v Police.

Liked Roxanne, and I suppose Message in A Bottle and So Lonely, but very little else. Never bought Outlandos or Zenyatta even when many peers did, but did snap up All Mod Cons, Setting Sons, Sound Affects and Gift. Wasn't so keen on earlier Jam, or latter day.

Did enjoy Dreams of the Blue Turtles - was the soundtrack to a holiday in Greece in the fortnight straight after Live Aid. A friend brought and played, and played, the cassette. Russians was a great track.

Thought the Style Council were just a bit too posey for my tastes, but do rate Paris Match as one of my all time favourite tracks. Also really liked Come To Milton Keynes, Walls Come Tumbling Down and the track Waiting.

Not overly familiar with solo Weller, or anything by Sting since that Fields of Gold period, but overall Weller hands down.



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suss wrote:

Liked Roxanne, and I suppose Message in A Bottle and So Lonely, but very little else. Never bought Outlandos or Zenyatta even when many peers did, but did snap up All Mod Cons, Setting Sons, Sound Affects and Gift. Wasn't so keen on earlier Jam, or latter day.


I have to confess that I never bought a Jam record until Snap!  Many of the songs I liked weren't on their albums, so I didn't bother.  But Snap! is a superb compilation, possibly one of the best I have ever had and very well worn.

I didn't really like The Police that much before Invisible Sun (though So Lonely and Can't Stand Losing You were exceptions), but Ghost in the Machine and Synchronicity were albums I really liked.  I even got a couple of Sting solo LPs before realising the last two Police albums were the exception than the rule.

Post Jam/Police, Weller has been of more interest.  The Style Council had their moments, Walls Come Tumbling Down and Shout To The Top come readily to mind, and his best solo work, Stanley Road ranks as high as his group output.

As for Sting, I can't think of anything decent he has done in the last twenty years or so since An Englishman in New York.



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ArrGee wrote:

I have to confess that I never bought a Jam record until Snap!  Many of the songs I liked weren't on their albums, so I didn't bother.  But Snap! is a superb compilation, possibly one of the best I have ever had and very well worn.


 Having the albums mentioned plus the majority of singles 78-80 meant I didn't bother with Snap!, but having just looked again at the 2CD listing (assume same as vinyl) I have to agree that is one inspired peice of compiling.

Throwing in classic b sides such as Butterfly Collector and Smithers Jones, not to mention English Rose, Mr Clean and Man in the Corner Shop shows whoever put that one together was well in touch with what the fans loved, well this one anyway. 

Noel's a big fan of Jam as I recall; I'm guessing 3-0 to Weller unless someone Sumnerphile sneaks a goal back before Noel gets his shot in. 



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Hmm, that's tough, going to have to think about that!

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Jules wrote:

Hmm, that's tough, going to have to think about that!


 Looks like she's dallying on the edge of the box and the chance to pull one back or put the result beyond doubt may have passed.

Weller Utd have their Irish international warming up on the sidelines and on recent form he's likely to take the first chance that comes his way. This could turn out to be a real drubbing for Peroxide City unless someone can respond quickly. They might need super sub Wes to save the day, although given his recent experience of hidings to nothing it may be a big ask smile.

Joan of Arc could have a say in the matter but seems to be struggling with injury (hangover?) of late, and hasn't appeared for a number of weeks. Perhaps rookie Lisa can become an instant hero and reduce the deficit for her fellow blondies?

It's all to play for......

 



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OK, just to say if you type up a quick reply, it's best to actually post it before getting distracted by voting as I have discovered it loses it! Will be back later to try and redo it!

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OK back again. What I wrote before at great length can probably be summarised a little just so that I don't get sacked for wasting too much time at work! I'll scrub the bit about giving in and being too obliging ....basically I was saying I like bits of both of their work. Didn't like admitting to liking the Police when at school cos of friendly music rivalry with school mates - and I wanted the Rats to be the best - which of course they were. Loved Roxanne and later Russians and most of their stuff. But also loved Going Underground, Down in the tube station etc. Got Wild Wood and Stanley Road plus 22 Dreams - mainly like them but sometimes have to be in right mood as can be a bit heavy going. Have You Ever Had It Blue (Style Council) from Absolute Beginners film is brilliant (nearly as good as Quiet Life by Ray Davies in same film but I digress). Do have a CD with Police and some solo Sting stuff on - don't know what it's called, got an Englishman in New York on it - anyway good to listen to in car, different sounds and moods but easy to listen to overall.

Have to say I find both of them come across as quite humourless and arrogant (I did put complete arses first time round but maybe that's unkind )

Anyway to sum up, I like music from both of them, but favour Sting as he's a fellow peroxide and just want to be a hero and disagree with you two And overall find it easier to listen to his stuff

Right that's it from me, gonna press post quick reply and hope it's second time lucky .........

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Without doubt my preference is for Weller, because I've always liked the Jam, though I'll never  tire of saying XTC are more my cup of tea, and I wish more people liked them. And Andy Partridge is one of the most entertaining, amusing, and witty rock stars ever.

I have always found Stings whining, er 'singing' not very appealing, though the Police (what a rubbish band name) admittedly produced many good singles, it's just they have always seemed lightweight and paradoxically over serious, if that makes sense. Sting solo just sounds completely self indulgent, Fields of Gold was a rip off from the soundtrack of The Wickerman, one of the most blatant rip offs ever imho.

Have only heard bits and pieces of Weller solo, mainly 22 Dreams, which contained the brilliant, folky Light Dreams, and most of the singles over the years. The Style Council were not my cup of tea- I've never really liked soul music- maybe I've got no soul! Weller can be a bit cranky, and over the years he hasn't particularly been a fan of Bob Geldof or The Boomtown Rats. Overall I have always liked the Jam, but in a slightly detached way, never with the almost complete emotional investment I had for the Boomtown Rats or XTC.

I'm happily listening to a double cd of Mercury Rev at the moment,  so neither Sting or Weller are clamoring for my attention. But my vote goes to Weller/ Jam/ SC

 



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Lisa wrote:

... but favour Sting as he's a fellow peroxide ........


There ain't much left to bleach these days...

 

Sting+Sting+In+Concert+qC3xRbCb6Tol.jpg

 On that basis I have to go with the white haired Weller. He looks very old!

Paul+Weller+answer+your+questions



-- Edited by ArrGee on Wednesday 21st of March 2012 06:37:35 PM

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Just as an aside I've been reminded very much of Sting/Police over last few weeks by the current #1, that Gotye track 'Somebody I used to Know'. It's been TOTP for about 6 weeks now.

Anyone else see (hear) that? Don't especially like the song (reminds me too much of Sting smile) but is quite a refreshing change from same old same old R&B artists and predominant sound over last dunno how many years. 

Maybe we're due a resurgence of late seventies sound and guitar based songs actually registering in charts. Yeah right.....



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suss wrote:

Just as an aside I've been reminded very much of Sting/Police over last few weeks by the current #1, that Gotye track 'Somebody I used to Know'. 


 Me too, I hate that song. Especially the Baa Baa Black Sheep music. Currently listening to Black Keys Brothers and Paul Weller's Sonik Kicks.



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OK, guess I'm going to have to concede defeat as it's 3-1, must say I'm totally underwhelmed by lack of support, stung in fact!!

How about another one then - Tom Jones vs Engelbert Humperdinck???  For me, it would have to be Tom - must admit I've not heard Humpie sing (or maybe blanked it out of my mind if I ever had).  But will admit to having a Tom Jones' compilation and quite liking it.  He is definitely a cool dude and there's something about his voice, maybe it's cos he's Welsh, I have a bit of "thing" about Huw Edwards too!  Shame I don't concentrate more on what he's actually saying though when he reads the news as then I'd be really well-informed and clever biggrin

Getting back to Sting though, think he's aged a little better than Weller - and maybe he does have some stray peroxide hairs lurking somewhere, in his ears, up his nose ....



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Lisa wrote:

How about another one then - Tom Jones vs Engelbert Humperdinck??? 

 

No.  Don't care too much for either of them.  Humperdinck only has two songs.   

 

 



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How did that photo get past Weller's PR machine?smile.gif  Must have been from a 'pics the stars don't want you to see' type website. Weller looks like a grumpy old man down the pub who would complain about 'that punk rock nonsense, wot's all that about then?'

One more observation about The Police - a lot of their singles sound really simplistic, just a few chords and a very simple tune eg Every Breath You Take or Walking On The Moon  or Message In A Bottle,  while The Jam and The Boomtown Rats sound is a lot more complex with much more going on, and melodies that are not too obvious.

Still The Police sold nearly 80,000 tickets when the played their comeback tour in Dublin a few years back, so they must have been doing something right.



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ArrGee wrote:
Lisa wrote:

How about another one then - Tom Jones vs Engelbert Humperdinck??? 

 

No.  Don't care too much for either of them.  Humperdinck only has two songs.   

 

 


 Seems Englebert has done things in reverse, being born plain Arnold  George Dorsey in Leicester in 1936 he adopted the stage name Englebert Humperdinck after a German  composer from the mid nineteenth century.

Never got Tom Jones, or any of those 'entertainer' types who have no ideas of his own and just sings middle of the road songs for a broad audience. Sinatra and Robbie Williams are fellow travellers of Jones, and Elvis Presley too, just don't like any of 'em.



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noelindublin wrote:

One more observation about The Police - a lot of their singles sound really simplistic, just a few chords and a very simple tune eg Every Breath You Take or Walking On The Moon  or Message In A Bottle,  while The Jam and The Boomtown Rats sound is a lot more complex with much more going on, and melodies that are not too obvious.


Playing Police songs on a guitar is far more difficult than Jam or Rats songs.  I can pretty much play anything on the first two Rats albums and do half decent renditions of a number of Jam songs, whereas with the Police the guitar bits are just impossible for me.  Andy Summmers is a very proficient and highly regarded guitarist, whereas Weller, Roberts and Cott aren't.  Sting has been scathing about the simplicity of Geldof's songwriting.

 

(As an aside a Geldof/Sting interview http://www.sting.com/news/article/102)



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noelindublin wrote:
...and Elvis Presley too, just don't like any of 'em.

 A little unfair on Elvis who didn't really start out that way.  Prior to the draft he was a genuine Rock 'n' Roller, the original.  But after Jailhouse Rock, he didn't really do too much.



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ArrGee wrote:
(As an aside a Geldof/Sting interview http://www.sting.com/news/article/102)

 Great interview, if it can be called that. More of a recorded conversation.

Proper LOL at the bit about windscreen cleaners smile.

Bob did seem less earnest in those days......just can't imagine that sort of spontaneous humour in an "interview" now. Maybe those asking the questions deserve the blame....or maybe he was just half cut in this one.



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Just heard that Paul Weller's latest album, Sonik Kicks, is topping album charts - his fourth solo number 1 album apparently ...

But Sting did have nicer hair

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Lisa wrote:

Just heard that Paul Weller's latest album, Sonik Kicks, is topping album charts - his fourth solo number 1 album apparently ...


 ... and his 11th top ten LP.  5 no 2, 1 No 4 and 1 No 8.

Also Stanley Road is a 4 X Platinum album.  To put that into context, the best a Jam LP did was Gold, but Adele 21 is 15 X Platinum.

You may be surprised to know that A Tonic For The Troops was platinum and outsold every Jam album. The Clash never did any better than gold, but The Sex Pistols, The Police and The Stranglers did all get platinum records

http://www.bpi.co.uk/certifiedawards/search.aspx

 

 



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ArrGee wrote:
noelindublin wrote:

One more observation about The Police - a lot of their singles sound really simplistic, just a few chords and a very simple tune eg Every Breath You Take or Walking On The Moon  or Message In A Bottle,  while The Jam and The Boomtown Rats sound is a lot more complex with much more going on, and melodies that are not too obvious.


Playing Police songs on a guitar is far more difficult than Jam or Rats songs.  I can pretty much play anything on the first two Rats albums and do half decent renditions of a number of Jam songs, whereas with the Police the guitar bits are just impossible for me.  Andy Summmers is a very proficient and highly regarded guitarist, whereas Weller, Roberts and Cott aren't.  Sting has been scathing about the simplicity of Geldof's songwriting.

 

(As an aside a Geldof/Sting interview http://www.sting.com/news/article/102)


 I would regard Garry Roberts and Gerry Cott as pretty 'proficient' guitarists, just that they are forgotten men of rock, in some sense and both men have been playing guitar for probably over forty years. Andy Summers is just a lot more well known, hence 'more highly regarded'.  

I had not read that Geldof/ Sting  faceoff before and must admit it was pretty candid and very funny, and not the usual tone of such interviews. Geldof seemed pretty 'conservative' regarding use of certain drugs as an aid to spiritual enlightenment, and most likely had not read up on tantric sex, hence he comes across as a bit ignorant and reactionary- in some areas he is not as well read and knowledgeable and can seem uncomprehending. Sting generally seems quite thoughtful and likable.

 



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suss wrote:
ArrGee wrote:
(As an aside a Geldof/Sting interview http://www.sting.com/news/article/102)

 Great interview, if it can be called that. More of a recorded conversation.

Proper LOL at the bit about windscreen cleaners smile.

Bob did seem less earnest in those days......just can't imagine that sort of spontaneous humour in an "interview" now. Maybe those asking the questions deserve the blame....or maybe he was just half cut in this one.


 It would be nice to hear the audio of that conversation as that would add to the 'spice' of the interview. Anybody quoting Geldof or Sting out of context would have a field day.smile.gif



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ArrGee wrote:
noelindublin wrote:
...and Elvis Presley too, just don't like any of 'em.

 A little unfair on Elvis who didn't really start out that way.  Prior to the draft he was a genuine Rock 'n' Roller, the original.  But after Jailhouse Rock, he didn't really do too much.


 The only 'enjoyment' I have ever gotten from Elvis is watching those Vegas freakshow comebacks, and seeing him fat and totally out of it in the latter days of his career. Songs about hound dogs don't really do it for me.smile.gif



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noelindublin wrote:

I would regard Garry Roberts and Gerry Cott as pretty 'proficient' guitarists, just that they are forgotten men of rock, in some sense and both men have been playing guitar for probably over forty years.


Tony Visconti didn't rate either at all, and to be fair he should have some idea.  Geldof did write that Garry's guitar playing was pretty rudimentary prior to Cott's departure.  Cott himself has admitted that he is not a particulary proficient rock guitarist...

http://www.cyberspace7.btinternet.co.uk/gerry3.htm

 



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 I doubt Geldof would risk the embarrasment of not having solid, competent players in his band. Most of the punk bands were making it up as they went along, and the Rats were no exception. The did have two years of touring and practice before they hit the big time, so any problems with incompetence on anyones part would have been sorted before they hit the big time.

Interesting that Gerry Cott was married and fairly well off before he decided to take the plunge and join the band. He might have kicked himself if he was sat at this tv watching the Rats at number one with Rat Trap, having decided a different career.

Don't know if Gerry has heard V Deep or In The Long Grass- I presume he has, and he strikes me as the sort of person who is fair, and would think these albums pretty good regardless of what had happened in the past.



-- Edited by noelindublin on Wednesday 28th of March 2012 12:45:43 PM

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noelindublin wrote:

 I doubt Geldof would risk the embarrasment of not having solid, competent players in his band. Most of the punk bands were making it up as they went along, and the Rats were no exception. The did have two years of touring and practice before they hit the big time, so any problems with incompetence on anyones part would have been sorted before they hit the big time.

-- Edited by noelindublin on Wednesday 28th of March 2012 12:45:43 PM


 As we're off topic anyway, I'd be quite surprised if Bob perceived it as 'his' band before about the third album. Realise he was always the natural frontman, but there seems to be plenty of anecdotal evidence that he was fairly insecure about how good he was early on, so wasn't likely to be too critical of the rest. Probably worth mentioning they were essentially mates as well. I reckon it was far more a team thing early days, with the others just  happy to let Bob satisfy his desire for the limelight while they didn't crave it. 

Reading what Gerry says it also backs up theory that Bob overcame some of those self doubts and took more of a lead, to the point where he just got too indulgent, dogmatic and selfish. I'd still maintain it wasn't anything to do with his rating of their talent, just that he suddenly had complete conviction in his, ultimately evidenced by his insistence on strumming away on stage himself. The Gerry departure and circumstances demonstrates for me when Bob viewed it as 'his' band.

Can't argue with fact that guitars featured less after FAOS, certainly in the R&B/rock style at least (although the break in Hurt Hurts is a notable exception), but it was all far more experimental in reggae, funk style etc. I don't think Geldof was edging out the guitar stuff so much as indulgently trying numerous different sounds where often brass or keyboards just happened to be more prominent. 

ITLG did signal (for me) a definite shift back to more basic sound, especially on tracks like Dave, Drag Me Down and Lucky, hence its appeal to some of us over the previous two, but too late. Fanbase was gone. Would love to know how much of that shift back was down to Geldof realising he'd blown it, or rest of band pointing it out.

Maybe they just turned up at the studio and said 'there's only one way to decide.....' wink



-- Edited by suss on Wednesday 28th of March 2012 09:53:31 PM

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noelindublin wrote:

I doubt Geldof would risk the embarrasment of not having solid, competent players in his band.

...

Don't know if Gerry has heard V Deep or In The Long Grass- I presume he has, and he strikes me as the sort of person who is fair, and would think these albums pretty good regardless of what had happened in the past.


Cott & Roberts are good enough, but going back to where we started The Rats songs were fairly strightforward and didn't require virtuosos.   It is interesting that post-Surfacing, the guitars were not to the fore (bar Whitehall 1212) and became submerged with the rest of the instruments.  There are barely any guitar solos of any mention.

It would be surprising if he hadn't listened to anything post Mondo Bongo, but I suspect much like footballers if you aren't involved anymore you tend not to care.



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 Johnnie and Simon (and Yoko Fingers!) wanted to do some songs together as Gung Ho, and park the Rats for a while.. A break of a few years might have given everyone some breathing space. Geldof, meanwhile, could have done a solo album or just taken a break from music. Sometimes no matter how good a band is, the public just decides it has had enough- any unfortunately for the Rats that time had come.

Meanwhile Live Aid intervened and with Geldof's huge media profile the days of The Boomtown Rats were numbered. Yes they might have continued for a few more albums, but I'd imagine they'd spent too much time together and all parties wished to move on with their lives. Who'd have believed ten years earlier that they could have achieved so much together,and the times were moving on. Nothing lasts forever. Even the thrill of having number one hits must become a bit boring after a while, and two is enough for anybody. For band members, friends and fans we'll always have the memories.smile.gif



-- Edited by noelindublin on Thursday 29th of March 2012 03:52:06 PM

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suss wrote:
ITLG did signal (for me) a definite shift back to more basic sound, especially on tracks like Dave, Drag Me Down and Lucky, hence its appeal to some of us over the previous two, but too late. Fanbase was gone. Would love to know how much of that shift back was down to Geldof realising he'd blown it, or rest of band pointing it out.

In The Long Grass was a last throw of the dice.  I suspect the band had pretty much given up on the UK, but there is little doubt they did aim for the US market, particularly with the re-recorded Rain, Drag Me Down and Lucky.  

That the album was released on the back of Band Aid/Live Aid meant they focused on something more commercial than experimental, but as subsequent events have proven people were not interested in the band and the music anymore, they were more interested in the man and his mission. 

The most active time on this forum was between the announcement of Live 8 and the day itself, yet pretty much none of those who posted had any interest at all in the music.

 



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Loudmouth

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suss wrote:
noelindublin wrote:

 I doubt Geldof would risk the embarrasment of not having solid, competent players in his band. Most of the punk bands were making it up as they went along, and the Rats were no exception. The did have two years of touring and practice before they hit the big time, so any problems with incompetence on anyones part would have been sorted before they hit the big time.

-- Edited by noelindublin on Wednesday 28th of March 2012 12:45:43 PM


 As we're off topic anyway, I'd be quite surprised if Bob perceived it as 'his' band before about the third album. Realise he was always the natural frontman, but there seems to be plenty of anecdotal evidence that he was fairly insecure about how good he was early on, so wasn't likely to be too critical of the rest. Probably worth mentioning they were essentially mates as well. I reckon it was far more a team thing early days, with the others just  happy to let Bob satisfy his desire for the limelight while they didn't crave it. 

Reading what Gerry says it also backs up theory that Bob overcame some of those self doubts and took more of a lead, to the point where he just got too indulgent, dogmatic and selfish. I'd still maintain it wasn't anything to do with his rating of their talent, just that he suddenly had complete conviction in his, ultimately evidenced by his insistence on strumming away on stage himself. The Gerry departure and circumstances demonstrates for me when Bob viewed it as 'his' band.

Can't argue with fact that guitars featured less after FAOS, certainly in the R&B/rock style at least (although the break in Hurt Hurts is a notable exception), but it was all far more experimental in reggae, funk style etc. I don't think Geldof was edging out the guitar stuff so much as indulgently trying numerous different sounds where often brass or keyboards just happened to be more prominent. 

ITLG did signal (for me) a definite shift back to more basic sound, especially on tracks like Dave, Drag Me Down and Lucky, hence its appeal to some of us over the previous two, but too late. Fanbase was gone. Would love to know how much of that shift back was down to Geldof realising he'd blown it, or rest of band pointing it out.

Maybe they just turned up at the studio and said 'there's only one way to decide.....' wink



-- Edited by suss on Wednesday 28th of March 2012 09:53:31 PM


 Suss- it was amiss of me to call it Geldof's band. I fully realise the co-operative nature of the endeavour and your piece is very perceptive and highly accurate. Geldof's overbearing, perhaps domineering personality maybe falsely assumes too much about him-he certainly was/is a driven character and a leader type.



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Cheers. Only my point of view but glad you got me thinking about it. I'd never have tried to analyse any of this stuff when it was actually happening.

Incidentally, I can still remember getting a deeply suspicious look from Geldof at stage door post gig on last album tour when I casually (and genuinely) enquired if he was still in touch with Gerry. You know how it's generally a quick autograph, minimal small talk and barely any eye contact...well on this occasion he looked up and stared straight at me, I suppose sizing up whether I was some journo, before realising it was innocent enough and saying 'no not nowadays'. I was too scared to ask any more questions worry.gif, so as I recall blurted 'here's 50p for Band Aid' and scarpered sprint.gif



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noelindublin wrote:

 Johnnie and Simon (and Yoko Fingers!) wanted to do some songs together as Gung Ho, and park the Rats for a while.. A break of a few years might have given everyone some breathing space. Geldof, meanwhile, could have done a solo album or just taken a break from music. 


Prior to Self Aid, according to Geldof, he was offered a contract to do a solo record and was looking to negogtiate a solo/band deal.  I suppose this would have been along the lines of the Bryan Ferry/Roxy Music deal.  The problem was that the band were not comfortable with being a side project with potentially the better songs being reserved for the solo album. Given the unlikelihood of The Rats continuing Crowe and Fingers formed Gung~Ho and that was that.  Many of their peers has split by then, so not very surprising they called it a day after In The Long Grass.



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Loudmouth

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suss wrote:

Cheers. Only my point of view but glad you got me thinking about it. I'd never have tried to analyse any of this stuff when it was actually happening.

Incidentally, I can still remember getting a deeply suspicious look from Geldof at stage door post gig on last album tour when I casually (and genuinely) enquired if he was still in touch with Gerry. You know how it's generally a quick autograph, minimal small talk and barely any eye contact...well on this occasion he looked up and stared straight at me, I suppose sizing up whether I was some journo, before realising it was innocent enough and saying 'no not nowadays'. I was too scared to ask any more questions worry.gif, so as I recall blurted 'here's 50p for Band Aid' and scarpered sprint.gif


 I presume you mean the ITLG tour.It's probably not the sort of question BG was expecting to be fair. The whole relationship between fans and stars of any kind is a whole hornets nets sometimes. Personally I would have no, or low expectations from such a meeting- the whole thing seems a bit unnatural anyway. Even liking the music can be deceptive as sometimes a stars musical persona can be at odds to how a fleeting encounter in real life shows them to be- most likely to be busy and preoccupied with other personal matters rather than being 'nice to fans'.

Best I think not to bother, so that we are left with our illusions rather than the memory of a scowl or blank expression from a hero. Perhaps a better question would have been 'Do you know the All The Rage lyrics offhand?smile.gif



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ArrGee wrote:
noelindublin wrote:

 Johnnie and Simon (and Yoko Fingers!) wanted to do some songs together as Gung Ho, and park the Rats for a while.. A break of a few years might have given everyone some breathing space. Geldof, meanwhile, could have done a solo album or just taken a break from music. 


Prior to Self Aid, according to Geldof, he was offered a contract to do a solo record and was looking to negogtiate a solo/band deal.  I suppose this would have been along the lines of the Bryan Ferry/Roxy Music deal.  The problem was that the band were not comfortable with being a side project with potentially the better songs being reserved for the solo album. Given the unlikelihood of The Rats continuing Crowe and Fingers formed Gung~Ho and that was that.  Many of their peers has split by then, so not very surprising they called it a day after In The Long Grass.


 Play To Win by Gung Ho is really good. I would have thought that if Simon and Johnnie had written songs for the Gung Ho project then they would use those songs themselves, with Geldof using his own material, or most likely songs written with Pete Briquette. Can't see Gung Ho at that time using Geldof songs or vice versa. It was time for the various band members to truly start looking after number one.

Ever notice all great bands have a Yoko involved in the break up?smile.gif 



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noelindublin wrote:

 Play To Win by Gung Ho is really good. I would have thought that if Simon and Johnnie had written songs for the Gung Ho project then they would use those songs themselves, with Geldof using his own material, or most likely songs written with Pete Briquette. Can't see Gung Ho at that time using Geldof songs or vice versa. It was time for the various band members to truly start looking after number one.

Ever notice all great bands have a Yoko involved in the break up?smile.gif 


 Not sure Yoko was responsible for the Rats break up.  Play To Win was good, but the other tracks on Gung~Ho are very disappointing.  I think The Ballard of the Lone Ranger is the best solo single by miles.  Even better than The Great Song of Indifference.

 

(How far off topic is this thread?)



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Mondo Bongo

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noelindublin wrote:
ot nowadays'. I was too scared to ask any more questions worry.gif, so as I recall blurted 'here'suss wrote:

Cheers. Only my point of view but glad you got me thinking about it. I'd never have tried to analyse any of this stuff when it was actually happening.

Incidentally, I can still remember getting a deeply suspicious look from Geldof at stage door post gig on last album tour when I casually (and genuinely) enquired if he was still in touch with Gerry. You know how it's generally a quick autograph, minimal small talk and barely any eye contact...well on this occasion he looked up and stared straight at me, I suppose sizing up whether I was some journo, before realising it was innocent enough and saying 'no ns 50p for Band Aid' and scarpered sprint.gif

 I presume you mean the ITLG tour.It's probably not the sort of question BG was expecting to be fair. The whole relationship between fans and stars of any kind is a whole hornets nets sometimes. Personally I would have no, or low expectations from such a meeting- the whole thing seems a bit unnatural anyway. Even liking the music can be deceptive as sometimes a stars musical persona can be at odds to how a fleeting encounter in real life shows them to be- most likely to be busy and preoccupied with other personal matters rather than being 'nice to fans'.

Best I think not to bother, so that we are left with our illusions rather than the memory of a scowl or blank expression from a hero. Perhaps a better question would have been 'Do you know the All The Rage lyrics offhand?smile.gif


 But it is fun to be brave and just talk to those you admire even if they think you're stupid!  First time I saw Garry and Simon, the best I could manage on spur of moment was "I've loved you since I was 13!", then at Wolverhampton gig tried to tell Simon I really liked Jiggerypipery stuff, then when he asked which track in particular, couldn't think of any titles, what the names of CDs were, what my name was ...Think I managed to think of one (track name that is!) after what seemed like an age!! Anyway, it sort of breaks the ice, I guess   Another band I've known for ages and seen zillions of times - the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain - have got past the stage of saying the gig was good, just talk about everyday stuff, travel arrangements etc, and maybe have a drink with them.  I think sometimes bands just like to see a friendly face and not have to be cool or try to impress either.  Works both ways, I guess ...

Have never heard any Gung Ho stuff - was interested a while back but never managed to find any CDS ...



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I've voted for Sting because he's sexier! Musically little in it I very much like both.

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In the Long Grass

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ArrGee wrote:
suss wrote:

Just as an aside I've been reminded very much of Sting/Police over last few weeks by the current #1, that Gotye track 'Somebody I used to Know'. 


 Me too, I hate that song. Especially the Baa Baa Black Sheep music. 


 Allies smile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NY4xE9rAY8k&feature=player_embedded



-- Edited by suss on Thursday 19th of July 2012 08:28:21 PM

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Got a second hand copy of Heavy Soul by Weller and it is utter rubbish except for Pea**** Suit and Heavy Soul. Also rubbish lyrics- Bob is a much better lyricist.

Only one way to decide? How about a duel on the green.smile.gif



-- Edited by noelindublin on Friday 20th of July 2012 08:31:09 PM

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